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Detroit Sports

Erik Jones Out At Joe Gibbs Racing In 2021

Erik Jones won’t return to Joe Gibbs Racing next season, ending his time with one of NASCAR’s top teams after three Cup seasons but several years in Gibbs’ driver development program.

“We appreciate all Erik has done for Joe Gibbs Racing over the past several years,” Joe Gibbs said Thursday night. “He joined us as a teenager and has accomplished so much in his time here and we remain focused on the remainder of this season and earning him a spot in the playoffs.”

The 24-year-old was discovered by the reigning Cup Series champion Kyle Busch when Jones beat Busch in the Snowball Derby late model race in 2012. Jones was 16 at the time and the victory opened the door for Jones’ rapid rise into NASCAR’s national series.

He ran five Truck Series races for Busch the next year and was the series champion in 2015. He ran a full season in the Xfinity Series for Gibbs the next year and was farmed out to Furniture Row Racing in 2017 in a Gibbs-affiliated ride.

The Furniture Row agreement didn’t work, though, and Jones moved into the Gibbs camp as one of its four drivers in 2018. Through 131 Cup starts over five seasons, Jones has two victories, both in the No. 20 Toyota for Gibbs.

He goes to his home track of Michigan International Speedway this weekend ranked 18th in the Cup standings and trying to work his way into playoff contention. Jones is also in a contract year but Gibbs has long had a backlog of young drivers and will likely replace Jones in 2021 with Christopher Bell.

Bell, also in the Gibbs pipeline, drives this year for Leavine Family Racing in another Gibbs alliance. But that team said Wednesday it is closing at the end of this season.

Jones won the Southern 500 for Gibbs in 2019 to earn a spot in the playoffs. He opened this season with a victory in the exhibition Busch Clash at Daytona International Speedway.

“I greatly appreciate the opportunity that JGR provided me with over the last four years and I wish the team nothing but success and good fortune,” said Jones. “JGR gave me a solid foundation from which to go out and compete at the highest level and I look forward to building on that in the years to come.”

Jones has driven for Toyota all eight years of his NASCAR career.

“We’ve become close not only to Erik but to his entire family. We’ve celebrated together, we’ve cried together and we’ve supported each other through it all,” said Ed Laukes, Group Vice President, Marketing, Toyota Motor North America

“Unfortunately, the time has come that we have to part ways from a competitive standpoint. We know Erik will continue to do great things in this sport and wish him nothing but the best in his future endeavors.”

© 2020 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


‘After I Found Out I Was Having A Girl, It Was Even More Motivation To Come Back And Play’: Michelle Wie West Joins ‘We Need To Talk’ On CBS Ahead Of PGA Championship

(CBS Local)- Michelle Wie West is one of the best golfers of her era, winning five times on the LPGA Tour and recording 59 career Top 10s. She stepped away from the game last year due to a wrist injury that became the latest in a long line of injury struggles for her.

Then, Wie West, became a mother this June when her daughter, Makenna was born. In going through the process of becoming a mom, Wie West says that she was scared at first because she felt that her body had let her down so many times with injuries in her career.

“I definitely had an interesting relationship with my body. I’m not talking about body image, but the actual functionality of my body. I had my appendix taken out, I struggled with colitis, I had a lot of internal stuff going on as well as wrist injuries and ankle injuries, and I just felt like my body let me down,” said Wie West in an interview with Tracy Wolfson and Amanda Balionis for We Need To Talk. “I had to stop playing last year because of my wrist injury and I was very emotional about it because I want to go out there and I want to do the thing I love the most and my body is not letting me. I just felt like at every turn my body was letting me down.”

“I just want to try to become the best role model I can be.”

After injuries sidelined @MichelleWieWest, she’s rejuvenated to return to glory on the course following the birth of her baby girl. pic.twitter.com/7O9uS6yzW3

— GOLFonCBS (@GOLFonCBS) August 6, 2020

“So when we were talking about having a baby and whatnot I was just internally so scared because I felt like ‘what if I can’t have a kid? I feel like my body has let me down so many times it was like can it do this? Then, through this whole process, I was really anxious because I was like my body has let me down so many times, I was like I don’t want my body to let me down this time,” continued Wie West. “This is the one time that it just needs to get together and pull together. And I’m just so proud of myself. It’s definitely changed my perspective on a lot of things. Figuring out that I having a girl, that changed my perspective even more so. When I first got pregnant, I was like, ‘okay, maybe this is time for me to retire.’ But, after I found out I was having a girl it gave me even more motivation to come back and play. Just showcase being a strong woman and I really just want her to become a strong woman in whatever sense that means to her. I just want to try to become the best role model I can be.”

Now, with Makenna by her side, Wie West is determined to make it back to the course to play at the highest level. She told Wolfson and Balionis that she aspires to have a moment with her daughter like the one that Tiger Woods had with his son, Charlie, after winning The Masters in 2019.

“I think it’s totally different watching someone on YouTube vs. in person and that moment that Tiger Woods had with his son Charlie, that is such a special moment. Even Suzanne Peterson after she made that putt to win the Solheim and her son was there those are such special moments. That’s something I want and aspire to have so it’s definitely made me want to work harder,” said Wie West.

The full interview with Wie West as well as an interview with PGA of America President Suzy Whaley is part of We Need To Talk’s eighth episode of the year. The episode is slotted to air at a special time, Saturday, August 8 at 3 p.m. EST on CBS Television Network leading into the network’s coverage of the PGA Championship third round starting at 4 p.m.

In addition to the interviews with Wie West and Whaley, Wolfson and Balionis are joined by Swin Cash and Dottie Pepper to break down the first two days of play at TPC Harding Park and preview the final two rounds.


Matt Kenseth Gets New Crew Chief

Chip Ganassi Racing has made a crew chief change for the No. 42 driven by Matt Kenseth, with engineer Phil Surgen taking over for the remainder of the season.

Surgen has been with the Ganassi organization since 2016. He replaces Chad Johnston, who had been the crew chief for the No. 42 team since 2016.

The team did not address Johnston’s status in its Tuesday announcement.

Kenseth was hired in late April after Kyle Larson was fired for using a racial slur while participating in an iRacing event. The former NASCAR champion had retired from the sport but was lured back for this disjointed season because Ganassi believed he was the most talented driver available.

Kenseth finished 10th in his debut with the team in May at Darlington but has had one top-10 finish since, a runner-up showing at Indianapolis last month. He finished 37th last weekend at New Hampshire and was involved in three cautions.

Kenseth’s status for 2021 is not clear, but Ganassi is believed to be courting Bubba Wallace. McDonald’s is one of the top sponsors of the No. 42 and already has an existing relationship with Wallace.

Wallace is in a free-agent season with Richard Petty Motorsports, which wants to bring Wallace back next year. Team co-owner Andrew Murstein has said a piece of ownership in the Petty organization has been offered to Wallace in their negotiations.

© 2020 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


‘Some Players Embrace It, Some Are Still Struggling With It,’ Says Nick Faldo On Spectator-Free Tournaments

(CBS San Francisco) — TPC Harding Park has a special meaning to the people of San Francisco. And with the PGA Championship scheduled to begin tomorrow, it should shine brightly on the national stage as well (chance of fog notwithstanding). Too bad that the municipal course, usually open to anyone who wants to play it, will be closed to fans for the season’s first major.

In-person sports during a pandemic are surreal for those few who are lucky (or unlucky) enough to experience them. “I have been for a few (baseball) games,” says KPIX sports director Dennis O’Donnell. “There’s no life within the stadium, or outside the ropes at a golf tournament, including Harding Park.”

>>READ: TPC Harding Park Profile: Municipal Gem Hosts The PGA Championship

The difference for the average television viewer is much less stark. According to O’Donnell, “when you see it on TV, it’s just the same. I don’t miss the fans. I’m able to focus on all the golf. It’s a beautiful golf course; it will show that way on TV. So, from an outsider’s perspective, it’s going to shine.”

O’Donnell knows the course as well as anyone, having grown up and come of age nearby. “I went to grammar school right at Lake Merced,” O’Donnell reminisces. “I went to college at San Francisco State. And after classes, we would sneak through a fence at Harding Park, play five holes, go back to college. At that time, Harding fell into grave disrepair. And it was Sandy Tatum, who brought Harding back to championship standards. And now it’s a gem of San Francisco. Harding Park has so much history for the locals, because it’s a public course. Everybody can play it. I think that’s what makes this PGA Championship so special.”

>>STREAM: PGA Championship

The insiders, those who will be calling the action, have a different perspective on the event. CBS Sports lead golf analyst Nick Faldo, who’s been calling the action from the studio, has seen a range of responses from players. “We’ve seen some players embrace it, some are still struggling with it. With this now being a major — they’ve had eight weeks of this — it’s not going to come as a shock. I think the intensity, the fact that it is a major, will be amped up.”

The lack of fans on site has led to improvements in the television broadcasts. “The audio has gone to a new level with the absence of fans,” notes CBS Sports golf anchor Jim Nantz. “We’re able to listen in, eavesdrop in on a player and caddie more than ever before.”

That access lends itself to a better understanding of the strategy behind the game. “We’d love to have the fans,” says Nantz. “But we’ve definitely seen the audio quality [of conversations] between the players and caddies improve.”

>>READ: ‘Toughest Test These Guys Have Faced So Far,’ Says Dottie Pepper On PGA Championship At TPC Harding Park

CBS Sports on-course reporter Dottie Pepper has experienced the difference up close. And it’s affected her approach to reporting events on the course. “You have to be a little bit more careful about where you stand, the way the wind is blowing,” says Pepper. “You can’t hide up against a wall of fans. You have to be more sensitive to how much you are moving if you’re across the line from a player. You kind of have to have eyes on all sides of your head to not be in a position to disrupt play. But I think we’ve done a remarkable job of patching together through the audio and making on-course and the 18th, 17th and 16th towers be so seamless. Hats off to our technical crew.”

Watch the PGA Championship, Saturday, August 8, 4:00 – 10:00 p.m. ET and Sunday, August 9, 3:00 – 9:00 p.m. ET on CBS.


‘Toughest Test These Guys Have Faced So Far,’ Says Dottie Pepper On PGA Championship At TPC Harding Park

(CBS San Francisco) — Going into the PGA Championship, it’s already been a long, strange season on the PGA Tour. And in some sense, it’s also only just beginning.

PGA Tour Season So Far

The 2019-2020 schedule kicked off innocuously enough with A Military Tribute at The Greenbrier back in September and rolled through its fall and winter events without much out of the ordinary. Then COVID-19 hit, stopping the Players Championship after one round. The PGA Tour, like most sports and much of the country in general was forced into an extended break.

Three months and multiple cancellations and postponements later, the Tour picked up again with a revised calendar. The Open Championship opted to take the year off. The Masters was moved to November, and the U.S. Open to mid-September. Both shifted to the 2020-2021 schedule. The PGA Championship moved to early August, becoming the current season’s only major.

In the weeks since the restart, major-level fields have played without fans on site to watch. The number-one ranking has changed hands twice. Rory McIlroy gave it to Jon Rahm, who passed it along to Justin Thomas this week. Bryson DeChambeau has excelled thanks to his added size and distance off the tee. But some of the world’s top-10 golfers, not to mention Tiger Woods, have failed to regain some continuity.

>>STREAM: PGA Championship

PGA Tour Calendar Going Forward

But the calendar can be viewed looking forward as well. “We’re about to enter the greatest stretch of golf in the history of the game,” according to CBS Sports golf anchor Jim Nantz. “Starting on Thursday, in an 11-month stretch, we’re going to have seven major championships. We’re going to have the (FedExCup) Playoffs. That includes two Masters, two PGA Championships… the Players Championship.”

“This is a tremendous time for the game,” says Nantz. “And what a time it is for the premiere players. If their game is in a good place… You could see somebody take two, three, who knows, maybe four of these seven majors.”

This week is the PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park. The event will once again feature most of the world’s top players inside the ropes, but no fans outside the ropes.

>>READ: Amanda Balionis On 2020 PGA Championship At TPC Harding Park: ‘The Ball Is Not Going To Go As Far As We’re Used To Seeing The Last Six Weeks’

PGA Championship Field

The entire top 10 is set to tee off, along with approximately 90 of the world’s top 100 players. Thomas hopes to continue his momentum after winning the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational and returning to number one for the first time since 2018. McIlroy, now third but only weeks removed from the top ranking, has won the event twice. Brooks Koepka, ranked sixth, will be seeking a historic third consecutive PGA Championship. The ninth-ranked Adam Scott will see his first action since the canceled Players Championship

The field also includes every champion from the last decade and a few from the previous decade, such as Tiger Woods (1999, 2000, 2006, 2007) and Phil Mickelson (2005). Padraig Harrington (2008) and Vijay Singh (1998, 2004) have both withdrawn.

With a stacked field, there will be no shortage of storylines playing out at Harding Park. All of the world’s top-10 players will enter the favorites conversation at some point. But the play of many of them since golf’s return raises questions. McIlroy hasn’t seen the top 10 since before the break. Dustin Johnson won the Travelers Championship, but he’s also missed two cuts and withdrawn from the 3M Open. Koepka had looked uninspired before his tie for second at last week’s WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational. Only Thomas, whose win over Koepka elevated him to number one, has shown any sort of consistency.

Woods will play in his second event since the Tour’s return. The first was a tie for 40th at the Memorial Tournament two weeks ago. He’s won the PGA Championship four times, though the last time was 13 years ago. His second-place finish in 2018 at Bellerive is his best in recent years. He also has some competitive experience on this course, including a win at the WGC-American Express Championship in 2005 and a strong performance at the Presidents Cup in 2009. An uneven game in limited action of late makes it unlikely he’ll be that competitive this year.

Jordan Spieth will get another chance at a career grand slam. Now ranked 62nd in the world and a few years removed from his last Tour win of any kind, the historic milestone still seems out of reach. (He would be just the sixth player ever.) A tie for 10th at the Charles Schwab Classic is his best showing over the last two months.

>>READ: TPC Harding Park Profile: Municipal Gem Hosts The PGA Championship

TPC Harding Park

A winner from outside the top 10 and beyond a handful of household names would not be all that surprising. That TPC Harding Park isn’t a regular stop on the PGA Tour makes it a little more likely. This “gem of San Francisco,” as CBS sports director Dennis O’Donnell describes it, is “… a shot-making course, not a boomers course. It’s going to be a course of strategy, not wail away from 400 yards…”

The course will be a par-70 for the event, stretching to 7,234 yards. Cypress trees line the fairways, which will play firm and have been narrowed significantly. The trees may induce conservative play given their propensity to disappear golf balls. The heavy sea air and cooler temperatures will also keep balls from flying as far as they might otherwise. The greens, refurbished with bentgrass in 2014, tend to be large and relatively flat, but should play fast. And then there’s the weather, with wind and fog always a potential factor.

“This is going to be the toughest test these guys have faced so far,” says CBS Sports on-course reporter Dottie Pepper, who had sneak peak yesterday. “It is mean. It is wet. The rough is extremely long. The greens are firm. The wind did come up a little bit. The thing the players were talking about most… was A) the rough, and B) how wet that rough is right now and C) the difference in temperature. This has been a really hot eight weeks we’ve covered leading into this. And there’s a 30 or 40-degree drop in temperature they were experiencing this morning. And everyone was talking a lot about that. When that happens, golf balls are not flying as far. You’ve got a golf course that’s set up extremely difficult. And it’s just going to be a huge test.”

>>READ: PGA Championship: A Hole-By-Hole Look At TPC Harding Park

PGA Championship Favorites

Here are the favorites for the PGA Championship:

Justin Thomas (10-1)

Thomas has probably been the most consistent player since the PGA Tour’s return. His win at the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational elevated him to the top of the rankings. But he also has multiple top-10 finishes since the return, including a playoff loss at the Workday Charity Open. never mind his 2017 PGA Championship. If Thomas’s putter is humming, he will be hard to beat.

Brooks Koepka (10-1)

Koepka seemed to turn things around a couple weeks ago and has since appeared much more dialed in. He’s coming off a runner-up finish behind Thomas at the St. Jude and always tends to punch it up a notch for the majors. As defending champion twice over, Koepka could become the first player since the 1920s to three-peat at the PGA Championship.

Bryson DeChambeau (11-1)

DeChambeau has never cracked the top 10 at a major, but that seems like a real possibility this week. With his bulked-up frame, he’s added some distance to his drives. Harding Park has some driveable par-4s, which could present the aggressive DeChambeau with scoring opportunities. But danger also awaits, as angles matter on this course too.

Watch the PGA Championship, Saturday, August 8, 4:00 – 10:00 p.m. ET and Sunday, August 9, 3:00 – 9:00 p.m. ET on CBS.


Amanda Balionis On 2020 PGA Championship At TPC Harding Park: ‘The Ball Is Not Going To Go As Far As We’re Used To Seeing The Last Six Weeks’

(CBS San Francisco)- This week’s PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park will look different than any major that we’ve seen before. No fans will be in attendance due to the coronavirus pandemic and the golfer’s take on a Harding Park course that presents a variety of different challenges.

CBS Sports golf reporter Amanda Balionis says that the lack of fans will actually test golfers in a different way on this particular course.

>>STREAM: PGA Championship

“I think that really just allows the golf course to show all of its teeth. The rough won’t be trampled down. The rough is around three and a half inches right now, but it’s going to be really thick and unpredictable and continue to get worse,” said Balionis in an interview with CBS Local’s Ryan Mayer. “I was just talking to Michelle Wie West before this and you can’t really see how big those trees are or appreciate how big they are on television. She said the fact that there are exposed trunks can really cause more chaos than you’d expect because you can see crazy bounces and landing areas.”

Aside for the potential hazards that golfers face for not keeping the ball in the fairway off the tee, the greens will be different than what they’re used to from a normal West Coast stop.

RELATED: TPC Harding Park Course Profile

“The greens have been resurfaced so they’re not the bumpy Poana that we’re used to seeing out West but there’s just enough Po left in it that you’re going to see some putts do things they’re probably not supposed to do in probably some

Fog rolls in over TPC Harding Park. Credit: Harry How/Getty Images

big-time moments especially as the week rolls on and things start to firm up a bit,” said Balionis.

Those challenges are ones that golfers on the Tour are used to adjusting to each week. Each course presents differing lengths of rough, a different speed to the greens and whether it’s trees, bunkers or both, different hazards to avoid with wayward tee shots. But, one other aspect that will be interesting to watch this weekend is the weather. The temperature is shaping up to be in the mid-50s to low 60s with winds anywhere between 10 and 18 miles per hour with the added element of fog throughout the weekend. Balionis says the fog, which she has affectionately named Carl, has made a huge appearance already this week. Combine those weather factors and there’s likely to be less length to shots than guys are used to.

“It’s been 55 degrees. Cold, fog, the ball is not going to go as far as we’re used to seeing the last six weeks,” said Balionis. “Accuracy is going to be key, length is going to be key and as always putting down the stretch will be as well.”

FULL INTERVIEW:

The PGA Championship is the first-ever major held at TPC Harding Park, a course that has seen its share of challenges over the years. At one point, things got so bad that the course’s fairways were used as parking lots for the 1998 U.S. Open held at Olympic Club. Just seven years later it held a WGC event at which John Daly remarked that the renovation of the course was so good “They need to park cars at the Olympic Club and play the U.S. Open over here.” For Balionis, this is the part she loves about the PGA Championship. It’s held at courses that the public can go and play to test their mettle at the same place the pros do.

“I think that, to me, is one of the coolest things about the PGA Championship. We get to see public courses, municipal courses that me or you can go out and play. Harding Park is really the epitome of that,” said Balionis. “When you go an roll up there, the clubhouse is a pretty average clubhouse, it’s not an intimidating place like Bethpage Black that has all of those signs “Beware” and stuff. TPC Harding Park is one of those courses that makes you feel like you belong and you can get around on.”

“It’s Going To Be Who Can Be Longest And Straightest Off The Tee”

Make no mistake, the course is made more difficult for the professionals, Balionis says, but the point remains that it becomes a connection point for growing the game with fans able to access the same course that the best in the world played. Speaking of the best in the world, they will be out in full force this week. The field, as you would expect for a major, is stacked with all of the big names fans could hope for. So, with the challenges the course presents, who’s game best measures up?

Brooks Koepka. Credit: Andy Lyons/Getty Images

“It’s going to be who can be the longest and straightest off the tee. If Brooks Koepka can straighten out a couple of the things we saw last week, he is very much going to be in play here going for that three-peat,” said Balionis. “Rory McIlroy, you cannot ignore Rory McIlroy this to me, screams his name.”

Kopeka, coming off a T-2nd last week at the WGC FedEx St. Jude Classic in Memphis, appears to have rounded back into form after being hampered by a knee injury in the beginning of the return to play. McIlroy, looking for his first major win since 2014, has struggled a bit since the return, his best finish being a T-11 at the Travelers. Outside of that he’s finished T-32, T-41, T-32 and T-47. But, he won the WGC-Cadillac Match Play at Harding Park back in 2015.

Another player that Balionis likes this week who is a bit more off the beaten path is Daniel Berger. Currently 20th in the Official World Golf Rankings, Berger finished T-2nd with Koepka and others last week. Balionis points to his recent track record and his game as reasons she believes he could be in the hunt.

“Daniel Berger is another one, someone that maybe would be considered a little bit of a sleeper but very few players have been as hot as he’s been so far with the restart,” said Balionis. “He’s long off the tee, extremely accurate and his putter has been as good as it’s ever been in his career.

Daniel Berger. Credit: Stacy Revere/Getty Images

Then, of course, there is the talk of the golf world this summer, Bryson DeChambeau. The 26-year-old has inspired plenty of conversation based on his physical transformation and increased length off the tee. That excitement generated each week by seeing what he can do has been a consistent theme since the restart.

“Bryson DeChambeau, you can never count him out now, I love that someone other than Tiger Woods has become must watch golf, you never know what he’s going to do, what he’s going to say,” said Balionis. “He’s worked his butt off and legitimately changed the game. If he can overpower this golf course and keep it straight? He could be one that we see rise very quickly up the leaderboard.”

Balionis will be on course talking with players as part of THE CBS coverage this weekend but she will also be part of this month’s episode of We Need To Talk, which is set to air at 3 p.m. EDT heading into CBS’ golf coverage at 4 p.m. Balionis says she’s loved her experience working on the show and that she hopes it becomes more of a norm and less an exception when it comes to all-women hosted, produced and anchored sports talk shows. Balionis says it’s been powerful to highlight women’s experiences like that of Michelle Wie West who is juggling being a new mother, a broadcaster, a Solheim Cup assistant captain and looking to play in the event next year.

“Talk about a powerhouse. She just had a baby, she’s about to broadcast a major and on top of that has accepted the assistant captain job for the Solheim Cup oh and by the way in between her newborn baby’s naps, she’s taking the baby out to the driving range to get her game dialed in because she hopes to be playing on that Solheim Cup team next year,” said Balionis. “Those are the things that women, we just we grow humans, we have humans and then keep on working and that’s just an experience that is so unique and so powerful. It’s wonderful to be able to talk to those women about that and see how they literally do it all and still have such high expectations for themselves in their career. I have to think it’s hugely motivational and inspirational and hopefully eye-opening too for our male counterparts.”

We Need To Talk airs this Saturday for the first time on CBS beginning at 3 p.m. EST/PST and leading into the network’s golf coverage beginning at 4 p.m.

Watch the PGA Championship, Saturday, August 8, 4:00 – 10:00 p.m. EST/PST and Sunday, August 9, 3:00 – 9:00 p.m. EST/PST on CBS.


TPC Harding Park Profile: Municipal Gem Hosts The PGA Championship

(CBS San Francisco) — TPC Harding Park has enjoyed a long and interesting life on the banks of Lake Merced in southwest San Francisco. The notable history of this municipal course began in 1925, two years after the death of its namesake Warren G. Harding. The 29th president, who enjoyed golf, died at the city’s Palace Hotel, while on a tour of the west. The public gem will add another chapter this weekend when it hosts the 2020 PGA Championship.

Renowned course architects William Watson and Sam Whiting built Harding Park Golf Club on 163 acres of city property almost a century ago. (The pair also designed the Lake Course at the nearby Olympic Club.) Watson and Whiting were paid $300 for their design services; the cost of constructing the par-70 course neared $300,000. The course opened as a 6,505-yard, par-73.

Harding Park Golf Club’s stature rose fairly quickly. The course hosted the United States Golf Association’s U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship in 1937, garnering praise nationwide. (The event returned 19 years later.) In 1944, it debuted on the PGA Tour, with Byron Nelson winning the San Francisco Victory Open there twice in the same calendar year. The course became a regular Tour stop in 1961, with the inaugural Lucky International Open, won by Gary Player.

>>STREAM: PGA Championship

Harding Park also hosted anyone who could pony up the very modest greens fee. As a result, it exposed countless players to the game and helped some local players ascend to the highest level of the sport. San Francisco native and 14-time PGA Tour winner Ken Venturi credits the course with his development in the sport. His parents worked in the pro shop, and he spent his youth on and around Harding Park. Johnny Miller, who won two majors among his 25 PGA Tour wins, enjoyed summers playing Harding’s nine-hole course and practicing on the putting green. George Archer, 1969 Masters champion and 13-time Tour champion, honed his short game at Harding Park.

By the end of the 1960s, Harding Park was deteriorating. The PGA Tour left, and the deterioration continued. Fast-forward to the 1980s, when “weeds, clusters of daisies and splotches of dirt came to characterize this once-pristine layout,” according to the San Francisco Chronicle. It’s lowest point came in 1998, when its fairways were used as parking lots for the U.S. Open at the neighboring Olympic Club.

Former Stanford golfer and USGA president Sandy Tatum took on the task of rejuvenating Harding Park. Despite opposition, the local government was eventually convinced that restoring the course would lead to high-profile events that boosted the local economy.

A $16-million restoration in 2002-2003 overhauled the course, upgrading it to championship caliber. The renovations lengthened the course by about 400 yards, but also highlighted its former glory. Since the upgrades, the course has hosted the WGC-American Express Championship (2005), Presidents Cup (2009), Charles Schwab Cup Championship (2010-2012) and WGC-Cadillac Match Play (2015). It became part of the PGA Tour’s Tournament Players Club network in 2010. The upcoming PGA Championship, the fourth to be held at a municipal course, will be Harding Park’s first major.

The course will play at a par-70, stretching to 7,234 yards. Cypress trees line the fairways, which will play firm and have been narrowed significantly. The trees may induce conservative play given their propensity to disappear golf balls. “It’s going to be incredibly risky because they cut the fairways down by 60 percent,” says CBS San Francisco sports director Dennis O’Donnell, who grew up near Harding Park and has played the course many times. “And within the rough, lush rough is going to be thick. So you can boom it, but at your own risk.”

The heavy sea air will also keep balls from flying as far as they might otherwise. The greens, refurbished with bentgrass in 2014, tend to be large and relatively flat, but should play fast, given this is a major. And then there’s the weather, with wind and fog always a potential factor. According to O’Donnell, “it’s a shot-making course, not a boomers course. It’s going to be a course of strategy, not wail away from 400 yards…”

>>READ: PGA Championship: A Hole-By-Hole Look At TPC Harding Park

Harding Park includes 12 par-4s. While at least two of them are driveable (seventh and 16th holes), two others are in the vicinity of 500 yards (ninth and 12th holes). The 470-yard, par-4 14th hole begins an impressive closing stretch along the lake, with amped-up views and amped-up challenges. It’s a straight approach to a front-sloping green with a gully on the left. The short par-4 on 15 measures only 401 yards but plays downhill with a sharp-left dogleg. The scenic closing hole, another par-4 at 480 yards bends around the lake on the left, with right-side fairway bunkers brought into play by a new tee. The wind picks up in this closing stretch with the water on the left.

The lack of fans may seem a little odd for a major on a municipal course that O’Donnell describes as “a gem of San Francisco. Harding Park has so much history for the locals because it’s a public course. Everybody can play it.”

With a pandemic raging, the PGA obviously made the right call in keeping fans away. And it shouldn’t detract from the season’s only major. Storylines abound, as golf’s best face a TPC Harding Park course to which they’ve had limited exposure.

Watch the PGA Championship, Saturday, August 8, 4:00 – 10:00 p.m. ET and Sunday, August 9, 3:00 – 9:00 p.m. ET on CBS.


‘Winning It Was The Best Feeling In The World’: Sofia Kenin On 2020 Australian Open, World TeamTennis On CBS Sports

(CBS Local Sports)– Sofia Kenin is only 21 years old, but she’s already accomplished a lot in her professional tennis career.

(Photo by Zhe Ji/Getty Images)

The American won the 2020 Australia Open, beat Serena Williams at the 2019 French Open and has made it up to number four in the WTA rankings. Before the professional tour returns with the Western & Southern Open and the U.S. Open and French Open later this summer, tennis fans will get the chance to watch Kenin in the World TeamTennis semifinals and finals on CBS Sports on August 1 and 2.

“We all know each other well and just bonding together is obviously a lot of fun,” said Kenin in an interview with CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “There’s a lot of shouting and rooting together. It’s obviously much different sitting on the bench and cheering for your teammates and they’re cheering for me. It’s a great energy, great atmosphere and we are all getting along really well.”

In addition to playing World TeamTennis, Kenin is also really excited that Billie Jean King will be in attendance this weekend to watch the WTT semis and finals. Kenin has had the opportunity to develop a relationship with the legendary tennis player and activist over the years.

“Billie Jean is here to support us and before she came, she asked if I wanted her to come,” said Kenin. “Of course, I’m honored to see her here. I’m super happy that she’s here and gets to support us. Hopefully we can do well in the playoffs. She really inspires me and I really look up to her. She’s done so much for women all around the world and all respect to her. She’s obviously a great role model to me and it’s a little bit intimidating being with a legend like her.”

Kenin was named the 2019 WTA Most Improved Player and won her first grand slam at the Australian Open in January. The 21-year-old says everything came together for her in that tournament and she was also a little superstitious along the way by eating at the same restaurant and watching the same TV shows.

“I was really superstitious and tried to do everything right,” said Kenin. “I was playing really well and felt each match I was playing better and better. There was a lot of emotions leading up to each match. When I was playing the matches, I was locked in and I was ready. I played some of my best tennis and played really good tennis and critical points and critical moments. As each match went, I got a lot more confidence. Winning it was the best feeling in the world.”

Watch Kenin and the rest of the World TeamTennis players this weekend on August 1 and 2 on CBS Sports.


CBS Sports Names Announcers For UEFA Champions League And Europa League Coverage

(CBS Local)- One day after releasing the full schedule of games for the UEFA Europa and Champions League coverage, CBS Sports has announced the commentary teams that will guide fans through the action for the rest of the 2019-20 season.

The studio coverage will be anchored by veteran host Kate Abdo, who has covered both the Champions and Europa Leagues before along with coverage of the Men’s and Women’s World Cup and several top flight club competitions in Europe. She’ll be joined in the studio by analysts Jamie Carragher, Roberto Martinez and Micah Richards.

Carragher and Richards both played in Champions League matches during their respective careers at Liverpool and Manchester City. Carragher was an integral part of Liverpool’s 2004-05 Champions League winning side.

Martinez is the current manager of the top-ranked international side in the FIFA world rankings, Belgium. He led the Red Devils to a third-place finish at the 2018 World Cup.

Peter Schmeichel and Alex Scott will serve as the analysts for the Champions League broadcasts both in-studio and on site in Portugal. Schmeichel won the 1999 Champions League with Manchester United and is considered among the best goalkeepers of all-time. Scott won the Premier League six times with Arsenal and also played in three Women’s World Cups making 140 appearances for the English national team. She also scored the game-winning goal in the 2006-07 UEFA Women’s Champions League final.

Former AC Milan midfielder Ruud Gullit will provide the studio analysis for the UEFA Europa League and serve as a contributor for the UEFA Champions League. The former Ballon d’Or winner won a pair of Champions League titles with Milan.

The game broadcasts will be led by play-by-play announcers Clive Tyldesley and Peter Drury who will call 10 matches including the UEFA Champions League Quarter-Finals, Semi-Finals and Final as well as the UEFA Europa League Final. Tyldesley will handle the Champions League Final with Drury getting the duties for the Europa League Final.

Other announcers and analysts will be announced at a later date. The studio shows will be produced from the IMG Studios near London. Schmeichel and Scott will provide analysis for the Round of 16 games from the studio before traveling to Portugal for the Quarterfinals, Semifinals, and Final of the Champions League.

The broadcasts will be put together by 37-time Emmy Award winner Pete Radovich. Radovich, currently CBS Sports’ Senior Creative Director, will be the Coordinating Producer for CBS Sports’ UEFA coverage. He served in the same role for Inside The NFL for the last 12 years.

“This is an incredible opportunity to showcase the best club soccer in the world, so it was important to bring in credible, knowledgeable and likable personalities for soccer fans everywhere,” said Radovich in a statement. “We are thrilled to have multiple UEFA Champions League winners, iconic former players and the manager of the FIFA No. 1 ranked national team in the world. Their experiences around the sport at the highest levels of competition along with their diverse backgrounds give us a great mix, and we are excited to have this unbelievable group headlining our coverage.”

The coverage begins next week on CBS All Access which is currently offering fans a free one-month trial through mid-August that will allow fans to watch the finale of the 2019-20 UEFA Champions and Europa League seasons.


NASCAR Looks To Broaden Sport’s Exposure With Minority Drivers

Rajah Caruth liked the animated autos of “Cars” as a kid, got hooked on the race scene after a trip to the track, and sharpened his driving skills as a teen via online racing.

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 19: NASCAR Drive For Diversity Driver, Rajah Caruth competes in the eTruck Series Night in America Powered by FilterTime, a live-online NASCAR Truck Series race on the iRacing platform, from his bedroom of his parent’s home on March 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. The online race was organized by NASCAR Xfinity Series driver Ryan Vargas in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic – benefited multiple charities and included other professional ARCA and NASCAR drivers. Caruth, 17, who is currently racing in the NASCAR Late Model series and was set to make his debut, is back home due to the pause in action due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to a NASCAR release, they have suspended the season through the first weekend in May, following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to not hold mass gatherings over the next eight weeks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Caruth, who represents Rev Racing, is one of the first drivers with an iRacing background to be selected for the aforementioned NASCAR program. He previously came out of the eNASCAR IGNITE Series. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Caruth might one day earn his shot at inspiring the next generation of drivers.

The 18-year-old Caruth is a NASCAR prospect, a young Black driver, and one of a half-dozen youngsters participating in the Drive for Diversity program tasked with finding and developing drivers for a sport lean on women and minorities behind the wheel.

“Ideally, I’d want to be in the Cup Series in the next decade,” Caruth said. “Hopefully, by then.”

The program has developed few drivers for the elite Cup Series over nearly two decades in existence — Bubba Wallace and Daniel Suarez are among the former members and the only ones currently with rides — but a renewed push at scouting younger drivers and promoting them has NASCAR optimistic more recent classes will reverse the trend.

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, FLORIDA – OCTOBER 23: L to R: Loris Hezemans, Isabella Robusto, Brooke Storer, Ryan Vargas, Lavar Scott, Perry Patino, Nicholas Sanchez, Rajah Caruth, Chase Cabre, Gracie Trotter, NASCAR Drive for Diversity Combine at New Smyrna Speedway on October 23, 2019 in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. (Photo by Brian Cleary/Getty Images)

Wallace’s extraordinary season and his emergence as a social activist, in fact, have put a bright light on the program, which wobbled for years between a public relations exercise and a meaningful avenue toward a Cup Series career.

There are 56 graduates of the Drive for Diversity pit crew program actively working across the three national series, including 27 at the Cup Series level. Cup rides for program graduates are scarce, though. Kyle Larson, who is half Japanese, was the most successful alumnus until he used a racial slur during a live-streamed virtual race and was fired by Chip Ganassi.

“There needs to be more resources available for that program,” said Brad Daugherty, the lone Black team owner in NASCAR.

The task of turning the program into more of a driver factory is on the agenda of Drive for Diversity director Jusan Hamilton.

NEW SMYRNA BEACH, FLORIDA – OCTOBER 23: Rajah Caruth climbs into his car, NASCAR Drive for Diversity Combine at New Smyrna Speedway on October 23, 2019 in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. (Photo by Brian Cleary/Getty Images)

The 30-year-old Hamilton, the first Black to serve as race director for a Cup Series race, is a former dirt track driver who applied to an early version of the program only to be told he needed more experience. As his D4D role expanded, Hamilton helped change the goals of targeting prospects as young as 12 and established a coordinated developmental system.

Drivers are tutored by older members or other mentors, receive marketing training and there is an emphasis on physical fitness.

“We can control the full process and develop the drivers, help them grow within the system from beginning up to when they’re ready to race at the ARCA level,” Hamilton said. “They can then showcase their talents and use that to get themselves beyond the touring level and up through the ranks of Truck, Xfinity, and Cup.”

SPARTA, KENTUCKY – JULY 12: Bubba Wallace, driver of the #43 Victory Junction Chevrolet, drives during the NASCAR Cup Series Quaker State 400 Presented by Walmart at Kentucky Speedway on July 12, 2020 in Sparta, Kentucky. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

The challenges of securing a major ride — support resources, critical sponsorship money, and connections — are difficult for any young driver but seem greater for minorities. Aside from pushing for more diversity inside the race car, D4D is also looking at ways to increase diversity among sponsorship, ownership, and support roles.

“It’s an uphill battle and that’s one of the biggest things the program sets out to offset at the youth level,” Hamilton said. “The program is now set up to be able to give them a better opportunity to make those connections and to understand those resources to get to the next level.”

NASCAR hasn’t had a Black driver win a Cup race since Wendell Scott in 1963. Caruth knows all about that and could teach a history lesson if needed. He considers himself a student of stock car racing.

“I was a pretty decent history buff on NASCAR,” Caruth said. “I did tons of school projects on it. My senior project this year, I did it on NASCAR right now. I spoke to a lot of other drivers and I feel like I know a lot more about the sport.”

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 19: Die-cast cars are seen as NASCAR Drive For Diversity Driver, Rajah Caruth competes in the eTruck Series Night in America Powered by FilterTime, a live-online NASCAR Truck Series race on the iRacing platform, from his bedroom of his parent’s home on March 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. The online race was organized by NASCAR Xfinity Series driver Ryan Vargas in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic – benefited multiple charities and included other professional ARCA and NASCAR drivers. Caruth, 17, who is currently racing in the NASCAR Late Model series and was set to make his debut, is back home due to the pause in action due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to a NASCAR release, they have suspended the season through the first weekend in May, following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to not hold mass gatherings over the next eight weeks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Caruth, who represents Rev Racing, is one of the first drivers with an iRacing background to be selected for the aforementioned NASCAR program. He previously came out of the eNASCAR IGNITE Series. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

He narrates his senior video titled ” How American Stock Car Racing Can Stay Relevant ” that offers a 4-minute, 25-second crash course to his YouTube channel subscribers on changes in the industry.

“A higher priority of esports has been a way to, not only attract new fans in a new demographic but also provide a new avenue for new drivers to get into the sport,” Caruth said. “Like me.”

Like Wallace was. He is one of at least eight Black drivers who have competed in a top-level NASCAR race, but that is stretched over the 72-year history of the series. Some who came before him question if NASCAR has done enough to involve the sport’s trailblazers.

FONTANA, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 29: Bubba Wallace, driver of the #43 Victory Junction Chevrolet, stands by his car before qualifying for the NASCAR Cup Series Auto Club 400 at Auto Club Speedway on February 29, 2020 in Fontana, California. (Photo by Katelyn Mulcahy/Getty Images)

“I definitely believe that utilizing the knowledge and experience of those that have raced in NASCAR of color would benefit them,” said Bill Lester, a Black driver who made 145 career NASCAR starts from 1999-2006. “I think I’d be able to offer a whole lot that would lead them in the right direction.”

Willy T. Ribbs had 26 career NASCAR starts — notably making 23 starts in the Truck Series when he was 46 — and he said NASCAR has taken small steps in becoming more inclusive and inviting.

“If this was a 500-mile race,” Ribbs said, “we’re in the second lap.”

Ribbs, though, said he hasn’t attended a NASCAR race in years, and if he does, it’s because “we’re going to celebrate the new look of NASCAR.”

16 Feb 2001: Willy T. Ribbs #8 gets plugged in before the Florida Dodge Dealers 250, part of the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series and the Daytona 500 Speedweeks at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona, Florida.Mandatory Credit: Robert Laberge /Allsport

Hamilton said he would welcome the former drivers back into the fold.

“These are guys who can certainly share experiences and if they want to share as driver-coaches, I’d love to have them involved,” he said.

The new-look Tibbs and others bank on could be found in a Driver for Diversity class that includes Caruth, Chase Cabre, Nicholas Sanchez, Gracie Trotter, and Isabella Robusto.

Caruth, a race fan since he was 6, was thrilled in 2014 when his family took him to a second-tier NASCAR race at Richmond International Raceway. Four years later, he attended the 2018 K&N finale at Dover and introduced himself to key members of Rev Racing.

WASHINGTON, DC – MARCH 19: NASCAR Drive For Diversity Driver, Rajah Caruth checks his live-broadcast Twitch stream as he competes in the eTruck Series Night in America Powered by FilterTime, a live-online NASCAR Truck Series race on the iRacing platform, from his bedroom of his parent’s home on March 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. The online race was organized by NASCAR Xfinity Series driver Ryan Vargas in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic – benefited multiple charities and included other professional ARCA and NASCAR drivers. Caruth, 17, who is currently racing in the NASCAR Late Model series and was set to make his debut, is back home due to the pause in action due to the coronavirus pandemic. According to a NASCAR release, they have suspended the season through the first weekend in May, following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to not hold mass gatherings over the next eight weeks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Caruth, who represents Rev Racing, is one of the first drivers with an iRacing background to be selected for the aforementioned NASCAR program. He previously came out of the eNASCAR IGNITE Series. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

Caruth, who graduated from a Washington-area high school and planned to enroll at Winston-Salem State and study motorsports management, is now in his second year of the diversity program. He recently helped organize the George Floyd 100, an iRacing event that raised awareness within the motorsports community about the Black Lives Matter movement.

“He’s really represented himself on the track and off the track like a true young professional,” Hamilton said. “He’s a very impressive young man. It’s been three years of growth. He still has a long way to go.”

It’s at least another year or two until Caruth advances to the NASCAR-owned ARCA stock car series. Add time in Xfinity or Trucks and it could be a while before any Cup Series shot arrives, not that he is deterred by that.

“I’m going to do whatever I can right now to get close to that,” Caruth said.

© 2020 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Tigers Rally To Beat Royals 5-4

JaCoby Jones hit a tiebreaking solo homer in the seventh inning, and Detroit’s bullpen came through again in a 5-4 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Wednesday night.

DETROIT, MI – JULY 29: JaCoby Jones #21 of the Detroit Tigers watches his solo home run against the Kansas City Royals that broke a 4-4 tie during the seventh inning at Comerica Park on July 29, 2020, in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers defeated the Royals 5-4. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)

A night after pitching six scoreless innings in a win over the Royals, the Tigers’ relievers held Kansas City without a baserunner for four. Detroit rallied from a 4-0 deficit thanks in large part to Jones, who doubled twice before connecting off Ian Kennedy (0-1) for his third homer of the year.

“Obviously, it felt great,” Jones said. “We were battling. Our pitching staff kept us in the game. They were grinding, getting outs.”

Jonathan Schoop also went deep for the Tigers. Maikel Franco hit two doubles and a single for Kansas City, and Whit Merrifield had two hits and scored twice.

Bryan Garcia (1-0) earned his first big league win, one of four Detroit relievers who pitched in the game. Joe Jimenez worked the ninth for his fourth save.

DETROIT, MI – JULY 29: Joe Jimenez #77 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Kansas City Royals during the ninth inning at Comerica Park on July 29, 2020, in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers defeated the Royals 5-4. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)

“Bryan was fantastic tonight,” manager Ron Gardenhire said. “Came in and the ball was really jumping out of his hand.”

Danny Duffy allowed only three hits in five innings for the Royals, but one of them was Schoop’s two-run shot in the fifth, which barely made it past a leaping Merrifield at the wall in right and tied the game at 4. Duffy struck out eight with one walk.

“I felt confident with what I was doing out there, it just didn’t go our way and it’s unacceptable,” Duffy said. “To have that kind of stuff tonight got to go deeper in the game, man. Brutal. Got to go deeper in the game.”

Merrifield is now 22 for 42 against Detroit’s Matthew Boyd after going 2 for 3 against him Wednesday. He led off the game with a double and scored on Franco’s two-base hit. Merrifield also singled to start the third and scored on a single by Franco. Ryan McBroom’s RBI single made it 4-0 in the third.

DETROIT, MI – JULY 29: Whit Merrifield #15 of the Kansas City Royals tosses his bat after hitting a pop-up for an out against the Detroit Tigers during the seventh inning at Comerica Park on July 29, 2020, in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers defeated the Royals 5-4. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)

Detroit chipped away with sacrifice flies by Schoop in the third and Niko Goodrum in the fifth. Then Schoop went deep to tie it.

The Tigers have homered in every game so far this season after finishing last in the AL in that category in 2019.

Boyd allowed four runs and nine hits in five innings for Detroit. He struck out six.

Jones was hit up high by a pitch in Tuesday’s game. He was able to keep playing but still wasn’t pleased a day later.

DETROIT, MI – JULY 29: JaCoby Jones #21 of the Detroit Tigers celebrates with third base coach Ramon Santiago after hitting a solo home run against the Kansas City Royals during the seventh inning at Comerica Park on July 29, 2020, in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers defeated the Royals 5-4. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)

“You get pitched up and in all the time, and these guys are the ones that pitched up and in on me last year and broke my wrist,” Jones said. “To get hit in the face yesterday just topped it off, but I mean, I’m over it.”

LINEUP CHANGE

Adalberto Mondesi was 2 for 21 on the season coming into the game — and made a baserunning blunder in the ninth inning Tuesday night. The Royals dropped him from third to sixth in the batting order Wednesday, and he tripled in the second and scored on Bubba Starling’s sacrifice fly.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Tigers: Gardenhire said RHP Dario Agrazal, who went on the 10-day injured list Monday, has forearm tendinitis.

UP NEXT

Royals rookie Brady Singer (0-0) makes his second career start Thursday night against Detroit’s Ivan Nova (0-0).

© 2020 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Michigan High School Athletic Association Clears Golf Tennis and Cross Country But Not Football, Soccer & Volleyball

LANSING, Mich. (AP) – The Michigan High School Athletic Association cleared low-risk sports on Wednesday, allowing golf, tennis and cross country to complete, but is holding off on allowing football, volleyball and soccer games to start.

MHSAA said they would decide by August 20 for those contact sports depending on how the spread of COVID-19 is going in the state of Michigan.

Practice can start on August 12 for all sports except football, which must wait until August 17.

🚨 BREAKING: MHSAA Representative Council Approves Phased-In Practice & Competition for Fall Sports >> https://t.co/EwY6h6FoXd

— MHSAA (@MHSAA) July 29, 2020

The council voted to cancel scrimmages in all fall sports and limited the number of teams that can compete in regular-season tournaments, invitationals, and other multi-team events.

Indoor sports like girls, volleyball, swimming, and diving will depend on Governor Whitmer’s ban on indoor sports facilities. Practices can begin outdoors, if possible.

It was not immediately clear how high school sports may be affected by the governor’s order that participants in much of the state — those regions in phase four of her economic reopening plan — keep at least 6 feet apart “at all times” during such activities. MHSAA officials said they had been keeping Whitmer’s office updated and noted that under her separate road map for opening schools, athletics are allowed in both phases four and five.

Phasing in competition is designed to deter the spread of the virus, the MHSAA said. The governor’s orders will limit the number of spectators.

Executive director Mark Uyl said offseason training was a positive for athletes this summer, and it is “of utmost importance to continue athletic activity moving forward. If we take a month off, our students will find opportunities to compete through non-school entities that may not be as focused on safety.”

He said the association would make “wise decisions based on medical guidance,” and the “easy way out” would have been to postpone sports until next spring.

“If we don’t play this fall, it won’t be because we didn’t make every effort to do so,” Uyl said.

© 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.


‘Quite A Challenging Golf Course For These Players,’ Says CBS Sports’ Trevor Immelman On WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

(CBS Miami) — The WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational slides back a month on the revised PGA Tour schedule. The new temporary spot — July 30 through August 2 — puts it a week before this season’s first major. Despite scheduling, this year’s event is sure to be a far cry from the typical warm-up event.

For one thing, it’s a World Golf Championship tournament, which puts it a step above the standard Tour stop. The purse ($10.5 million) is bigger, and more FedExCup points (550) are on the line. And while not quite on par with a major, it will certainly feel like one this year.

The upcoming FedEx St. Jude boasts the top eight players in the world and 45 of the top 50. That includes recent number one Jon Rahm. “The guy is just supremely talented,” says CBS Sports golf analyst Trevor Immelman.” And the consistency that he’s showed… He’s played at 85 PGA Tour events since he’s been a pro; 37 of those he’s been in the top 10, with a number of wins. So, the consistency that he continues to compete with, in the biggest tournaments against the strongest fields, really is impressive.”

The player he replaced, Rory McIlroy, is also back in action after missing the 3M Open. “Since the return to golf, his play hasn’t quite been up to the standards that we’re used to from him,” Immelman points out. “The interesting thing with McIlroy is it generally just takes something small with him, and then he catches fire and he gets on a run. And he’ll go on a run for two or three months and rattle off three, four, five wins quite quickly. And so he normally just needs a little bit of a spark to get going.”

This would be the time to do it, with the PGA Championship in a week and the FedExCup Tournaments shortly after.

Defending champion Brooks Koepka, who has dropped from the top spot to number six over the course of a strange 2020, will also be looking to turn things around. “He’s been struggling with a left knee injury,” notes Immelman. “He had thought that he would be able to get that sorted during the break. But, as he’s come back and started playing week after week again, it has been bugging him. And whether that’s the reason or not, we’re not 100% sure. But he just hasn’t been able to get any of that momentum that we were used to from him, and has been missing a few cuts, just not quite getting things going.”

Recent Tour winners in the field also include Collin Morikawa, who edged out Justin Thomas at the Workday Charity Open, and Bryson DeChambeau, winner of the Rocket Mortgage Classic. Dustin Johnson, who won the Travelers Championship but withdrew from the 3M Open with a bad back, also returns.

Tiger Woods will take another week off. In his post-layoff return two weeks ago, he tied for 40th at the Memorial, a pedestrian performance on a course where he dominated earlier in his career. Woods will likely show up for the PGA Championship next week.

The on-course excitement of a Tiger siting at TPC Southwind would have been muted regardless. Spectators will be barred from attending once again this week, as the PGA Tour aims to continue its COVID season. The Tour has been largely successful so far. Testing and social distancing are taken seriously. Compromised players are removed from competition; seven players had to skip the Travelers in late June. While the occasional COVID case was always likely, an outbreak like the one affecting the Miami Marlins has so far been avoided.

>>READ: TPC Southwind Profile: A Stiff Challenge At The WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

This week’s top-notch field will take on TPC Southwind, among the harder courses on the Tour. The track has been part of the circuit since 1989. Up through 2018, it hosted the FedEx St. Jude Classic, and the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational since. The scenic par-70 course measures 7,238 yards and favors ball-strikers who can shape shots with precision. “Two par-5s and both are reachable,” notes Immelman. “But there is a number of long par-4s on this golf course, and generally a pretty high premium on hitting the fairway off the tee. So it is quite a challenging golf course for these players.”

In addition to challenging fairways, the greens are firm, unless the weather brings rain. (Thunderstorms are likely Thursday and Friday, and rain is possible Saturday.) Water hazards affect play on more than half of the holes. And when the wind picks up, which is often, the difficulty is compounded that much more. “All in all, this has always been one of my favorite golf courses on the PGA Tour,” says Immelman.

The 11th hole may be the course’s most recognizable. The 155-yard par-3 is similar to TPC Sawgrass’s iconic island green on 17. The green is surrounded by a pond, with a small bunker guarding the front edge. The wind can hold up a lofty shot and drop it in the water. Longer shots might find one of the two backside bunkers.

>>STREAM: WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

Here are the favorites for the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational:

Jon Rahm (11-1)

Rahm took over the world’s top ranking after his win at the Memorial. His best post-layoff finish prior to that was a tie for 27th at the Workday Charity Open. He fired a first-round 62 last year at TPC Southwind, one stroke off the course record, en route to a seventh-place finish.

Rory McIlroy (11-1)

McIlroy, the world’s previous number-one player, was just deposed by Rahm. He’s struggled a bit since golf’s return, though has also occasionally seemed on the cusp of pulling things together. A tie for 11th at the Travelers is his best finish since the break. He placed fourth in the event last year.

Bryson DeChambeau (12-1)

Before missing the cut at the Memorial, DeChambeau had a streak of four top-10 finishes since golf’s return. That included a win at the Rocket Mortgage Classic. He’s ranked seventh in the world and playing some of the best golf on Tour. While his limited history at TPC Southwind is underwhelming, that was a different player. According to Immelman, “when you watch this guy hit a tee shot in person, it is amazing how far he hits the ball, and how accurate he is for how far he hits the ball. This golf course is also going to suit that.”

Justin Thomas (12-1)

Thomas has also impressed over the last month and a half. Ranked third in the world, he’s missed one cut in five events since the return and came up just short at the Workday Charity Open. Thomas finished 12th at this event last year. “He’s got to be one of the guys to watch this week,” says Immelman.

Watch the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational Saturday, August 1, 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. EST and Sunday, August 2, 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. EST on CBS.


UEFA Champions, Europa League TV Schedule: How To Watch, Match Schedule & Times

(CBS Local)- CBS Sports announced its broadcast schedule for the upcoming return of the UEFA Champions League on Wednesday. Europe’s top-flight club competition has been on pause since April due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Now, the competition is set to return on August 5 with the Round of 16 games for the Europa League beginning with Shaktar Donetsk taking on VfL Wolfsburg and Copenhagen battling Istanbul Basaksehir. Then, the Champions League returns on August 7 with Round of 16 play between Manchester City and Real Madrid. CBS All Access will serve as the home for every Champions League match running through the final on August 23 while CBS Sports Network will also air coverage of the final and two other matches on August 7 and 8.

In order for fans to enjoy the conclusion of this year’s Champions League action, CBS All Access is now offering a one month free trial promotion for new subscribers through mid-August. That promotion will allow fans to watch every Champions League and Europa League match in August for free during their trial.

Below you can find the dates and times for the conclusion of this year’s Champions League and Europa League season as well as where each match will be available. Beginning with the 2020-21 season of the Champions League and running through 2023-24, CBS All Access will air all matches with select games airing on CBS Television Network. All times are Eastern.

Champions League

Friday, August 7:    
Manchester City vs. Real Madrid (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access / CBS Sports Network
Juventus vs. Lyon (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Saturday, August 8:    
Barcelona vs. Napoli (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access / CBS Sports Network
Bayern Munich vs. Chelsea (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Wednesday, August 12:    
Quarterfinal 1 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Thursday, August 13:    
Quarterfinal 2 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Friday, August 14:    
Quarterfinal 3 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Saturday, August 15:    
Quarterfinal 4 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Tuesday, August 18:    
Semifinal 1 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Wednesday, August 19:    
Semifinal 2 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Sunday, August 23:    
Final 3:00 PM CBS All Access /

CBS Sports Network

 

Europa League

Wednesday, August 5:    
Shakhtar Donetsk vs. VfL Wolfsburg (Round of 16) 12:55 PM CBS All Access
Copenhagen vs. Istanbul Basaksehir (Round of 16) 12:55 PM CBS All Access
Manchester United vs. LASK (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Inter Milan vs. Getafe (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Thursday, August 6:    
Sevilla vs. Roma (Round of 16) 12:55 PM CBS All Access
Bayer Leverkusen vs. Glasgow Rangers (Round of 16) 12:55 PM CBS All Access
Wolverhampton Wanderers vs. Olympiacos (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Basel vs. Eintracht Frankfurt (Round of 16) 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Monday, August 10:    
Quarterfinal Matches 1 & 2 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Tuesday, August 11:    
Quarterfinal Matches 3 & 4 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Sunday, August 16:    
Semifinal 1 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Monday, August 17:    
Semifinal 2 3:00 PM CBS All Access
Friday, August 21:    
Final 3:00 PM CBS All Access

Pair Of Two-Run Homers Lift the Tigers To 4-3 Victory Over Kansas City

DETROIT (AP) —  Kansas City’s Whit Merrifield launched a three-run shot in the top of the third, but the Tigers Jonathan Schoop and Christin Stewart each hit a two-run homer in the third inning to lift the Detroit Tigers to a 4-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Tuesday night.
Tyler Alexander (1-0) and four other relievers kept the Royals scoreless for the final six innings, with Joe Jimenez pitching the ninth for his third save.
There were a pair of blunders in the ninth on the same play when Detroit first baseman C.J. Cron dropped a popup hit by Adalberto Mondesi, but Mondesi rounded first too far and was thrown out before he could get back to the bag.
Rony Garcia worked the first three innings for Detroit in his major league debut. The 22-year-old right-hander looked sharp until the third. That’s when Brett Phillips hit a grounder that bounced off Cron for an error — and after Garcia retrieved the ball, his throw to first sailed past for another error.
That play left runners on second and third with one out, and Merrifield followed with a drive to left that made it 3-0. Garcia recovered to strike out his final two hitters.
“It was a very happy experience. It’s something that I’ve been dreaming since I was a kid,” Garcia said through a translator. “I felt very happy being on the mound and saying, finally, ‘I made it. I’m a major leaguer.'”
Kansas City starter Kyle Zimmer pitched two scoreless innings, then hit JaCoby Jones with a pitch to start the Detroit third. Tyler Zuber (0-1) relieved and allowed the homers to Schoop and Stewart.
Mondesi went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts and the baserunning mistake. Royals manager Mike Matheny said he’s pressing.
“We’re just going to continue to talk to him, (let) him breathe a little bit,” Matheny said. “He’s such a pure and natural player, everything he does. I know there are things right now he’s not happy with.”

Tigers manager Ron Gardenhire wouldn’t say much about the progress of top pitching prospect Casey Mize, who was left off the active roster for the start of the season. Mize was the top pick in the 2018 amateur draft, and Detroit fans are eagerly anticipating his big league debut — whenever it happens.
“He’s fine. He’s doing great,” Gardenhire said when asked about Mize before Tuesday’s game. “Not allowed to talk about him. I get in trouble every time I do.”


Scottie Pippen Downplays Any Rift With Michael Jordan In Wake Of ‘Last Dance’ Documentary

AP – Scottie Pippen says he’s talked with Michael Jordan since “The Last Dance” documentary aired in the spring and downplayed any rift between the retired Chicago Bulls stars.
“Why would I be offended by anything that happened 30 years ago” Pippen said.
Jordan widely praised Pippen in the documentary that chronicled the Bulls’ dynasty in the 1990s as the best teammate he ever had — both players were elected to the Hall of Fame. But Jordan called out Pippen in the second episode for making a “selfish” decision to delay offseason surgery on a ruptured tendon in his ankle until after the start of the 1997-98 season. Jordan said in the documentary he didn’t understand Pippen’s decision.
There were reports that Pippen was unhappy with his portrayal in the documentary, but he said Tuesday, “I wasn’t upset about it.” The documentary also included Pippen’s refusal to enter Game 3 of the 1994 Eastern Conference semifinals in the final seconds.
“It didn’t bother me at all,” Pippen said. “It was an opportunity for our younger generation that hadn’t seen or knew anything about basketball in the ’90s.”
The series aired over five consecutive Sunday nights in April and May and included never-before-seen footage from the 1997-98 season, one where the team chased its sixth championship in a span of eight years.

Scottie Pippen is introduced in the 2020 NBA All-Star – AT&T Slam Dunk Contest on February 15, 2020 (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

The 54-year-old Pippen won six NBA championships with the Bulls, was a seven-time All-Star and won two Olympic gold medals. He’s now an NBA analyst, primarily for the ESPN studio show, “The Jump.”
He picked the Los Angeles Lakers as the favorite to emerge out of Florida the NBA champion.
“If you wanted to pick one, I’d say whichever team LeBron James is on.,” Pippen said. “The fact that his experience, his ability to pull a team together, the ability to be dominant. He’s the most dominant player in the game right now with Kevin Durant not being in the game. ”
The documentary was a ratings winner when sports was on hiatus because of the coronavirus pandemic. ESPN and Nielsen said that the final two episodes of ‘The Last Dance” averaged 5.6 million viewers.


TPC Southwind Profile: A Stiff Challenge At The WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

(CBS Miami) — TPC Southwind’s been a regular stop on the PGA Tour since 1989. Located in Memphis, Tennessee, the private golf club hosted the FedEx St. Jude Classic through 2018. The title sponsor, whose corporate offices are nearby, then took over what was then the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, moved the event to to TPC Southwind and rechristened it the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational.

The heightened Tour status — WGC events offer larger purses and additional FedExCup points — rubs off on the host course as well. But TPC Southwind hardly needed the additional cachet. It’s long been one of the Tour’s harder courses and bigger draws.

TPC Southwind was designed by Ron Prichard on a former dairy farm nestled in the rolling Tennessee countryside. (A couple of grain silos and a windmill remain.) The architect, best known for restoring classic Donald Ross courses, looks to bring that traditional aesthetic to newer courses. And he accomplished that goal here. His designs can also be found at such notable courses as Aronimink Golf Club in Pennsylvania and Charles River Country Club in Massachusetts. Tour veterans Hubert Green and Fuzzy Zoeller consulted on the project.

>>STREAM: WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational

In 2004, the TPC Southwind underwent an extensive renovation. The work included 11 new tees and 15 new bunkers. The fairways were slimmed down and adjusted, with the grass changed from Bentgrass to Bermuda grass. The course was extended by over 200 yards, with trees and native areas added. The upgrades qualified it for Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program certification.

More upgrades have occurred over the last year. And while these renovations weren’t as extensive as those from 15 years prior, they were significant. Bunkers were added, resized and re-edged. Layouts on certain holes were shifted with yardage added.

The scenic TPC Southwind, a par-70, measures 7,238 yards. And as CBS Sports golf analyst Ian Baker-Finch put it in a 2017 interview, “you better come prepared to play well, because you can get in trouble pretty easily if you’re not sharp.”

This ball-strikers course requires precision and shot-shaping. Seven of the holes dogleg left, five more dogleg right. The fairways can be challenging; the greens are firm. Water hazards can be found on more than half of the holes. And when the wind picks up, which it often does, the difficulty is compounded that much more.

The par-3 11th hole may be the course’s most notable. At 155 yards, it’s similar to TPC Sawgrass’s iconic island green on 17. A pond surrounds the green, and a small bunker guards the front edge. Players tend to go with a short iron to make the green; laying up is obviously not an option. The wind can hold up a lofty shot and drop it in the water. Longer shots might find one of the two backside bunkers.

The 14th hole, a longer par-3 at 231 yards, is among the Tour’s more difficult par-3s. It plays from a raised tee and carries over a pond that guards the front and right of the green. The green slopes back toward the water.

The 18th hole, a par-4 that stretches to 448 yards, doglegs to the left around another pond. Bunkers guard the fairway to the right to make things even more interesting. A strong finishing hole, the 18th won’t pack quite the punch that it was in past years without fans on hand.

Even without spectators, this finishing hole promises its share of drama. The WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational boasts a stellar field of the PGA Tour’s best in the final tournament before the season’s first major. The top eight players in the world have committed, and because it’s a no-cut event, they’ll play through the weekend.

Watch the WGC-FedEx St. Jude Invitational Saturday, August 1, 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. EST and Sunday, August 2, 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. EST on CBS.


Sound Mind Sound Body Strives To Deliver Academics, Athletics And Life Skills

 

In 2004, the Sound Mind Sound Body (SMSB) Football Academy was created to increase the number football student-athletes graduating high school and earning college scholarships in the Metro Detroit community. During this time a significant number of under-served students were not obtaining scholarships due to various factors including but not limited to: lack of exposure, poor grades and bad character. Sound Mind Sound Body developed a unique curriculum that combined academics, athletics and life skills. The SMSB curriculum would be delivered by national instructors, motivational speakers, college and NFL coaches along with community mentors. This formula would make Sound Mind Sound Body the top Football academy in America!

 

 

Curtis Blackwell, President and CO-Founder ( SMSB ) – Being from the city of Detroit seeing so many of the most talented players not make it to the next level because of academics, character or lack of exposure, I felt like we had to do something to fill that void.

 

Maliq Carr, Wide Receiver – This program has taken me from a D-3 player to a D-1 player with in the years. First off your GPA has to be high, it’s a sliding scale with your SAT or ACT score. So getting the help with SAT’s or ACT’s really helps a lot and the homework helps your grades.

 

Since 2004, over 13,000 students have become SMSB certified. Over 10,000 of these students have graduated high school while 1,000 SMSB certified student-athletes have earned college scholarships. In 2007, the program expanded to Washington D.C. along with Tulsa, Oklahoma and Tampa, Florida. In 2016 the program will be held in six cities- Detroit, Washington D.C., Tampa, Houston, Atlanta and Los Angeles.

 

 

 

 

John Wangler, Adidas Regional Manager – Curtis has done a great job with his school program, he wants to develop the whole person on the field and off. Part of that is prepping these student athletes for the SAT & ACT along with tutorials to prepare for those exams.

PURPOSE

Use football as a vehicle to improve the number of high school students in under-served communities that graduate high school and also attend college. Our mission is to create well rounded young men that understand the SMSB formula for SUCCESS:

 

© 2019 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this story. 


Minnesota Vikings’ Infection Control Officer Tests Positive For COVID

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) —  Eric Sugarman, the Minnesota Vikings vice president of sports medicine who’s in charge of the organization’s virus prevention plan, has tested positive for COVID-19, the team announced Monday.
In a statement from the Vikings, Sugarman said he and his family members immediately quarantined themselves and began following the NFL’s appropriate protocols after testing positive over the weekend.
Sugarman, who has two teenage sons with his wife, Heather, was appointed infection control officer for the Vikings earlier this year after the coronavirus outbreak necessitated the role.
“At this time we are all doing fine and experiencing only mild symptoms,” Sugarman said. “I have an immense amount of pride in the effort I have personally put forth to protect the NFL family, the Minnesota Vikings organization and our community with thoughtfulness and decision-making based on the current science over these last four months. I am humble to be serving in that capacity as it has been some of the most rewarding work of my career.
“But as I sit here in quarantine, it is clear this virus does not discriminate. It should continue to be taken seriously. I encourage people to take the necessary precautions and follow guidelines that have been established nationally and locally.”
The Vikings said they’ve tested all individuals who’d recently been in close contact with Sugarman, who has begun his 15th season as the team’s head athletic trainer and his 24th year in the league.
Sugarman had not had any recent contact with players, the Vikings said, and no additional cases within the team’s facility have been reported to date. Sugarman will handle his duties as infection control officer remotely as much as possible until his return.
“The health and safety of every member of our organization, our fans and of the broader community is paramount,” the Vikings said in their statement. “We encourage everyone to take this virus seriously and to practice the established precautions.”


Crafton Ends 67-Race Winless Streak At Kansas

Matt Crafton had won more Truck Series championship than he’d had races the last couple years.

That finally changed on Saturday.

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS – JULY 25: Matt Crafton, driver of the #88 Ford, celebrates with the checkered flag after winning the NASCAR Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series e.p.t 200 at Kansas Speedway on July 25, 2020 in Kansas City, Kansas. (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)

The 44-year-old Crafton finally ended a three-year winless streak when the three-time and reigning series champ held off Christian Eckes over the final 20 laps to win the second race of a doubleheader at Kansas Speedway. It was his first victory since Eldora in July 2017, a frustrating stretch off 67 races and oh-so-many near misses.

“It was very sweet. Not a lot of give-up in these guys, no doubt,” Crafton said before a burnout in front of the empty grandstands. “We came back from the whole pandemic, we were fast but we had no results to show for it. We led laps at Charlotte and we just had horrendous races, four races in a row. But we’re back now.”

Crafton stayed out of a slew of late-race cautions on Saturday to find himself at the front on the final restart. The 19-year-old Eckes, chasing his first career Truck Series win, managed to trim a deficit of more than a second to one-tenth with two laps to go, but he couldn’t make his last opening stick. He wound up cruising across in second place.

“Just what a comeback for our team, We stunk yesterday. I can’t sugarcoat it,” Eckes said. “We were terrible. We worked last night and today to get better. We were just perfect at the end.”

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS – JULY 25: Matt Crafton, driver of the #88 Ford, leads Christian Eckes, driver of the #18 Safelite AutoGlass Toyota, during the NASCAR Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series e.p.t 200 at Kansas Speedway on July 25, 2020 in Kansas City, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Almost perfect. Just like Eckes almost made it to victory lane for the first time for the second straight week.

“I mean, it’s not as much anger as last week at Texas,” he said, “but at the same aspect, it’s a little disappointing. But it’s hard to be disappointed how we ran yesterday and how we came back today.

Grant Enfinger was third, Tanner Gray fourth, and Ben Rhodes fifth on a stifling afternoon under the sun. It was about 90 degrees when the trucks rolled off the starting grid, one day after the heat during the late-afternoon opening race resulted in five drivers — including Crafton — getting treated afterward at the infield care center.

Zane Smith showed good speed in the doubleheader opener Friday night and finished sixth, which meant he was lining up on the outside of Row 5 when the field was inverted for the second race at Kansas Speedway.

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS – JULY 25: Trucks race to start the NASCAR Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series e.p.t 200 at Kansas Speedway on July 25, 2020 in Kansas City, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

He showed even better speed right from the start Saturday.

The 21-year-old driver from Huntington Beach, California, quickly worked his way through the field and held off Brett Moffitt to win the opening stage. Smith drove away from the field again in his No. 21 Chevrolet to win the second stage, too — and a third for the weekend after he was the Stage 1 winner on Friday night.

The trucks from GMS Racing spent most of the day running at the front, at one point in four of the top five spots, until things began unraveling with about 40 laps to go. Moffitt and Smith were bunched together with teammate Tyler Ankrum when Smith got into him on the front stretch, turning Ankrum in front of Moffitt and into the wall.

KANSAS CITY, KANSAS – JULY 25: Safety crews respond to Tyler Ankrum, driver of the #26 Liuna! Chevrolet, after an incident during the NASCAR Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series e.p.t 200 at Kansas Speedway on July 25, 2020 in Kansas City, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

“That’s the second time this year we’ve been KO’d by a teammate and I’m disappointed,” Moffitt said. “We had a fast Chevy and it’s a bummer we couldn’t go out there and fight for the win. We had a truck capable of it.”

Sheldon Creed was safely at the front for GMS until bumping into the outside wall shortly after the restart, causing damage to his rear. He managed a few more laps before ending up in the wall again and tearing up his truck some more.

© 2020 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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